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Full text of "Classic, The (1942)"

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President's House 2 

Contents 3 

Dedication 4 

Mr. Venable 5 

President's Message to the Class 6 

President Bowman 7 

Editor's Acknowledgement 8 

Faculty 9 

Seniors 2 5 

Senior History 58 

Ivy Oration 62 

Ivy Ode 64 

Statistics 65 

Commencement Week 66 

Baccalaureate 61 

Class Day 68 

Commencement 69 

Autographs 70 

Underclassmen 71 

Taconic Hall 78 

Activities 79 

Snapshots 96 

Advertisements 99 

Directory 105 

Autographs 108 



dedication.: 



to- a Qentlemcm 



J\ GREAT man once said, "Parting and forgetting? 
What faithful heart can do these? Our great thoughts, 
our great affections, the truths of our life, never leave us." 
The gracious friendship of Wallace Venable has been 
one of these great truths of our life. His good counsel 
and friendship will be a bridge over the dark and stormy 
waters that lie ahead. He has kindled the spark within 
each one of us. And to him The Class of Nineteen Hundred 
Forty-Two respectfully dedicates this book. 

Walter Edmund Primmer, President 




MR. VENABLE 



to- the Glai.4, a£ 1942 



"pROM THE peace of the college campus you go into a 
world at war. To the men of the class will come the 
high privilege of serving in the armed forces of our 
country. To the women will come the like high privilege 
of defending and preserving in the class rooms the free- 
doms for which we fight. You must possess to the high- 
est degree the two supreme virtues of warriors, — courage 
and loyalty. 

I am confident that the college has enlightened and 
clarified the courage and faith which you as American 
youth possess. With minds keen and free, with hearts 
stout and undismayed, and with faith unwavering even 
in darkest hours, there can be no defeat. 

Grover C. Bowman 




MR. BOWMAN 



SroUtoSbL Ack*iatvledcj,eMe*U 



AS EDITOR of the Year Book I wish to thank all those who have 
lent moral support to our brain child, as well as those people who 
have actually worked to make it a reality. Everyone has been most kind 
and cooperative. 

The members of the staff 

Literary Advisor — Miss Mary Underhill 

Business Advisor — Mr. Andrew Flagg 

Our Photographer — Purdy's of Boston 

Mr. William Roberts of the Excelsior Printing Co. 

Mr. Arpiar Saunders of the Greylock Photo Engraving 

Those people who have written material: 
Shirley Bower — House Council 
Geraldine Stanton — W. A. A. 
Angela Crowley — Sophomore History 
Marjorie Fairfield — Freshman History 
Norma Blanchard — Junior History and Student Council 
Ruth Black — Student Council 
Helen Sinderman — Glee Club 
Janet Broadbent — a large part of Senior History 
Typist — Miss Lillian Crowley 

Mary Louise Rhoades, Editor 



8 



fyactUtif 




ZEUS: GOD OF WISDOM 

et We come but now, a little while before you, by the other way 
which was so rough, and hard, that the climbing now will seem 
but play to us." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto II 




PRESIDENT GROVER C. BOWMAN 

Williams B.A. 

Yale M.A. 

Rhode Island College of Education Ed.D. 

"God be with you. 

I bear your company no more." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto XVI 



10 




LILLIAN E. BOYDEN 

Boston University B.S., M.A. 
Music Department 

. . . ."Thus I was without tears and sighs before the 
song of them who always sing the notes of the eternal 
offices." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto XXX 



11 




HARRY S. BROUDY 

Boston University B.A. 
Harvard M.A., Ph.D. 
Graduate Course (Director) 
German 
Philosophy 

"Who knows most, him loss of time most grieves." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto III 



12 




ANDREW S. FLAGG 

Mass. School of Art B.S. in Ed. 
Art Department 

"Do Fortune as she list, I stand prepared." 

Divine Comedy Inferno Canto XI 



13 



» 






\ 




ELIZABETH M. JENKINS 

Columbia M.A. 
Education Department 

"From fear and from shame I wish that thou 
hence forth disentangle thyself, so that thou mayst 
speak no more like one who dreams." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto XXXIII 



14 





EDMUND LUDDY 

Boston College B.A. 
Boston University M.A. 
History Department 

"Let no step of thine descend; ever up the mount 
behind me win thy way" 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto IV 



15 




HAZEL B. MILEHAM 

State Teachers College, Springfield, Mo., B.S. 
University of Chicago M.A. 
Yale University Ph.D. 
Director of Training 

"Stand thou as a firm tower which never shakes its 
summit for blast of winds." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto V 



16 





MARY UNDERHILL 

Radcliffe B.A., M.A. 
Harvard Ed.M. 
English Department 

"As for the leaves that in the Garden bloom my 
love for them is great." 

Divine Comedy Paradiso Canto XXVI 



17 




WALLACE H. VENABLE 

University of Vermont B.S. 
Columbia M.A. 
Science Department 

"Now mark well bow I thread this pass to the truth 
for which thou longest, that thou thereafter mayest 
know to keep the ford alone." 

Divine Comedy Paradiso Canto II 



18 




f 



CORA M. VINING 

Bridgewater State Teachers College, B.S. in Ed. 

Boston University M.A. 

Librarian 

"To fair request 

Silent performance maketb best return." 

Divine Comedy Inferno Canto CXXIV 



19 





BETH WESTON 

Boston University B.S., Ed.M. 
Physical Education 

"Ye that lag behind come follow up, strongly up." 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto II 



20 





BERTHA ALLYN 
Office Staff 

"What is this, ye laggard spirits? 

What negligence, what tarrying is this?" 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto II 



21 







TERESA FERGUSON 



Office Staff 



"Howbeit, in order that now thou mayst bear shame 
for thy transgression. " 

Divine Comedy Purgatorio Canto XI 



22 




IRENE GOLDEN 

Framingham State Teachers College B.S. in Ed. 
Matron of Dormitory 

"Ye other few, who timely have lift up your necks 
for bread of angels whereby life is here sustained. " 

Divine Comedy Paradiso Canto II 



23 



\ 



^lai+ii+uj, Schoal faculty 



ALICE M. CARD 
ETHEL M. CARPENTER 
VIOLA COOPER 
MARTHA DURNIN 
IDELLA HASKINS 
MARION KETCHUM 
LORETTA LOFTUS 
VERONICA LOFTUS 
HELEN MALLERY 
HAZEL B. MILEHAM 
CATHERINE TOBIN 



24 



Seniobl 




HERCULES: GOD OF LABORS 



25 




BARBARA WORTH BEALS 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Current Events 3 

"With malice toward none, with charity for all." 



26 




RUTH EVELYN BLACK 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

Treasurer 2 
Drama Club 4 

Drama Club Play 
Current Events 3 
Class President 3 
Student Council President 4 
House Council Representative 1 
President's List 2,3,4 
W. A. A. State Conference 1,2,3 
Boston Conference 4 

"The highest proof of virtue is to possess boundless 
power with out abusing it." 



27 




JANET JACKSON BROADBENT 

Glee Club 1,2,3 
Current Events Club 1,2,3 
House Council 3 
Grindstone Staff 2 

"I've taken my fun where Yve found it" 



28 




MARION BROWN 

W. A. A. 1,2 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4 
Choir 1,2,3,4 
Class Treasurer 1,2 
Representative to Student Council 4 
Student Council Secretary 3 

"As you are a woman, be lovely 
As you are lovely, be various." 



29 




LENITA GERTRUDE CLARK 

W. A. A. 1,2,3 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4 

Assistant Librarian 1 
Choir 1,2,3,4 
Drama Club 4 

Drama Club Play 4 
House Council Secretary Treasurer 3 
Photography Editor of Yearbook 4 

"Though I am young, I scorn to flit 
On the wings of borrowed wit." 



30 




ROBERTA COLBURN 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Glee Club 4 
Drama Club 1,2,4 

President 4 
Current Events 1,2,3,4 
Vice-President of Class 1,2 
President's List 3,4 
Boston Conference 4 

"Exhausting thought, 

And living wisdom with each studious year." 



31 







FRANCES LORETTA COLLINS 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

Glee Club 1 

Drama Club 2 

Current Events Club 1,2,3,4 

Newman Club 1,2,3,4 

President 4 

Conference Delegate 3 
Vice-President of Class 3 

fr A winning way, a pleasant smile, 
a kindly word for all." 



32 




MARY FRANCES COURTEAU 

W. A. A. 1,2 

Junior Prom Queen 3 

"Is not life a hundred times too short for us to bare our- 
selves." 



33 




ANGELA CROWLEY 

Newman Club 2 
President's List 1,3 

"A merry heart doeth good like medicine." 



34 




ALTHEA LOUISE EBELING 
W. A. A. 3,4 

"J laughed, and danced and talked and sang." 



35 







GUSTAV FAEDER 



Drama Club 1,2,3 
M. A. A. 1,2,3,4 



"Put thyself into the trick of singularity." 



36 







MARJORIE FAIRFIELD 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Glee Club 2,3,4 

Accompanist 
Drama Club 4 
House Council Representative 2 

"Be wise worldly, be not worldly wise." 



37 




LEWIS MORTON GREEN 

M. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Drama Club 2,3,4 

Property Manager 

"... .and from his lips drop gentle words." 



38 




LEONARD PAUL KOCZELA 

M. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Drama Club 1,2,3 
Current Events 1,2 
Newman Club 1,2,3 
Class Treasurer 3 
Grindstone Sports Editor 2,3 
Axis Editor 1 

"My remembrance is very free and clean from any im- 
age of offense done to any man." 



39 




VALMORE LAFONTAINE 

House of Philosophy, Montreal, Canada 1,2 
M. A. A. 3,4 

Treasurer 4 
President's List 3 

"But yet he made a thousand friends." 



40 




IAN MALCOLM 

University of Maine 1 
M. A. A. 2,3,4 

President 3 
Drama Club 2,3,4 
Commuters Council 3 
President's List 3 

"Who does not love wine, women and song, 
Remains a fool his whole life long." 



41 





MARY JEAN McANDREWS 

W. A. A. 1,2 

Glee Club 1,3,4 
Class Secretary 2,4 
Commuters Council 3 

"Nothing ever succeeds which exuberant spirits have 
not helped to produce." 



42 




DOROTHY ANN MULLINS 

W. A. A. 1,2 

Glee Club 1,4 

Drama Club 2 

Current Events Club 4 

House Council Representative 4 

Business Manager of Yearbook 4 

"To e^/ rfW to drink and to be merry." 



45 







MARY LUCY NEWMAN 
W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

"In her tongue is the law of kindness." 



44 




KATHERINE ELIZABETH OSBORN 

W. A. A. 1,2 

Glee Club 1 

Current Events Club 2,3 

Assistant Manager of Yearbook 4 

"Good words are worth much and cost little. 



45 




KATHLEEN OUIMETTE 

W. A. A. 1,2 

Class Treasurer 4 
President's List 3,4 

"Read, mark, learn and inwardly digest." 



46 




WALTER EDMUND PRIMMER 

Drama Club 3,4 

Drama Club Play 4 
Student Council 4 
President of Class 4 
Representative to New York Conference 4 

"There be of them that have left a name behind them. " 



47 







EVA PUPPOLO 



W. A. A. 1,2 

President's List 3 



"How high is she?" 

"Just as high as my heart." 



48 




MARY LOUISE RHOADES 

W. A. A. 1,2 

Glee Club 1,2,3,4 

Current Events Club 1 

House Council Vice-President 3 

Editor of Yearbook 4 

Assistant Editor of Grindstone 2 

Drama Club 4 

Director of Play 4 
President's List 1,2,3,4 

"Enough work to do and strength enough to do it." 



49 




DOROTHY OLLA SESSLER 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Glee Club 1 
Drama Club 4 
Current Events Club 3 
Art Editor of Yearbook 4 

"The vocation of every man and woman is to serve 
other people." 



50 




2nd LT. JOHN P. SHERMAN 

M. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

Current Events Club 1,2,3,4 

Student Council Secretary 4 

Representative to New York Conference 3 

President's List 3 

"When this cruel war is over. 
Praying that we meet again." 



51 




JOHN STANLEY SULLIVAN 

M. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

Vice-President 3 

President 4 
Drama Club 1,2,3,4 

Drama Club Play 1,2,3,4 
Newman Club 1,2,3 
President of Class 1,2 
Student Council 1,2,3 
Editor-in-Chief of Grindstone 2 
Assistant Editor of Yearbook 

"Variety is the very spice of life." 



52 




HELEN EDNA SZOSTAK 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

Vice-President 3 

President 4 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4 

Librarian 2 

Vice-President 3 
Newman Club 1,2,3,4 
Current Events Club 4 
Delegate to W. A. A. State Conferences 3,4 

"Let all things be done decently and in order." 



53 




MARGARET HELEN WELLS 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 

Secretary 2 

Head of Sports 3 

Conference 3 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4 

Choir 1,2,3,4 
Drama Club 4 

Drama Club Play 4 
Vice-President of Class 4 
Student Council 2 
Representative to Conference 2 

"It's happy goes as lucky goes." 



54 




JEANETTE MARIE WOODLOCK 

Glee Club 1,2,3,4 

Choir 4 

Secretary 3 

Accompanist 3 

President 4 
Drama Club 4 

Drama Club Play 4 
Current Events Club 3 
Secretary of Class 1 
Newman Club 1,2,3,4 
Associate Editor of Yearbook 4 
President's List 1,2,3,4 

High Honors 4 
Eastern State Conference 4 

"An outward and visible sign of an inward and spirit- 
ual grace." 



55 




LEILA YATES 

W. A. A. 1,2,3,4 
Commuters Council 4 

"Consider that I laboured not for myself only, but for 
all them that seek learning" 



56 



tf-otUH&i GlaU. MemhvU, 



"Absent in body, present in spirit." 

Norman Bianco 

Mary Jane Blanquart Ralston 

Elizabeth Cooper 

Alva De Paoli 

Frederick Foster 

Nancy Gorman 

Mary Elizabeth Hoctor 

Virginia Evans Kemp 

Ruth Barbara Moriarty 

Jean McNeil Chenail 

Bernard Mimno 

Mathew Naughton 

James Nowell 

Dorothy Rathbun Lacatell 

John P. Sherman 

Mary Alice Stockwell 

Carla Taubert 

Frances Varian 

Mildred Varian Dennis 

Dorothy Woodward Norman 



57 



^Ue Servian, 7eAtame*U 

HISTORY AND SONGS OF THE CLASS OF '42 

IN THE beginning Mr. Bowman called the women and the men to the 
number of fifty. And they were without form and order and Dumb- 
ness was upon the face of them, and the spirit of questioning moved upon 
the face of them. 

And Mr. Bowman said, "Let there be knowledge," and there was 
knowledge. 

And Dr. Broudy said, "Let the class bring forth work: German 
bearing verbs and Math bearing answers whose evil is in themselves: 
and it was so. 

And Mr. Luddy said, "Let the class bring forth works bearing know- 
ledge of the History of Man." And behold he sacrificed unto them 
Thorndike, and Morrison and Commager; whereupon the class took 
council. 

And it came to pass that after several weeks the library begot Fish and 
Shaw, and the mighty hunters found them. And all said, "Wilt thou 
share with thy brother?" For there was sore need of books. And the 
hand of authority came upon them that shared not. And they bowed 
their heads and were sore afraid, and after a time they did according to 
the word and did learn the ways of ancient man. 

And Mr. Flagg said, "Let the class bring forth knowledge of the 
History of Art. Thou shalt have illustrated books for thy classes and 
thou shalt look upon the handiwork of the ancient artists, which have 
been since the world began." And light was delivered unto them that 
sat in Darkness. 

The Class of 1942 took council among themselves and selected a 
leader who was the son of Sullivan to lead them in the way that they 
should go, but they went not. 

And the Sophomore Class having mischief in their hearts said unto 
them, "We will have dominion over thee." Whereupon many of them 
that were Freshmen approved not their saying; And it came to pass that 
several weeks later the Freshmen held a festival on Allhallows Even. 
And unto the Sophomores they did wondrous things. After these 
happenings were done the class did gather in council and brought forth 
the committees for the dance, and there were umbrellas of many colors. 
And there were soft lights and music, and it was the month of May. 

And now the college did proclaim a festival in honor of the spring, 
with music and pageants and dancing, and they did make a bull called 
Ferdinand, a graven image to the delight of all the children and the 
elders. And it was said of them that they cast forth the bull. 



The class declares the glories of Mr. Venable, and their Math showeth 
his handiwork. 

58 



Day after day he speaks and night after night they study. They have 
no Math or Science where his voice is not heard. More to be desired 
are his marks than gold: yea then much fine gold: and sweeter his praise 
than honey. 

We will extol thee Mr. Venable: the class will extol thee. For thou 
hast lifted us up: thou hast guided us truly. 

A pleasant counselor art thou: an ever present help in time of trouble. 

Chapter 2 

And the congregation of the Class of 1942 journeyed out of the wil- 
derness of Sin according to the commandments of Mr. Bowman and 
learned as Sophomores. And when it came to passing there were fewer 
of the children of '42. So the class lifted up their voices and wept and 
the faculty cried that night. 

It was a good thing to give thanks unto the Sophomores for they 
were still the largest class. To show forth their great ability they gave 
S. T. C. a dance in the evening of November third and in that same night 
brought forth a momentous pumpkin. With an orchestra of ten pieces 
from within the pumpkin they beat upon the walls with a loud sound. 

O Mr. Bowman, thou hast made us glad through thy work and we 
will triumph from the energy expended in climbing Mt. Greylock. 

Before we attended "Gone With the Wind" or ever thou hadst 
placed upon us the wicked penalty of probation even from beginning to 
end thou art president. 

Thou turnest to Students who cut classes and sayest, Return ye, 
Sophomores of S. T. C. 

For thirty days of close residence in thy sight are but a minute when 
it is gone and as a cat nap in class. 

But O President, remember how short our time is. 

Clap your hands all ye classes and sing in chorus with voices of tri- 
umph. For thy voices most high are terrible. But when Miss Boyden 
leadeth they are the voices of triumph. 

O come, let us sing, let us follow the leader, Miss Boyden, and be as 
one voice: yea as one voice attacking together. And citadels shall fall: 
yea, they shall be flattened. 

Blessed are those who vote against Play Day for they shall inherit 
the privilege next year. 

As a hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth the class after 
Miss Weston. 

Why art thou cast down O my class, and why art thou disquieted? 
Hope for the end of the period, for surely it must come. 

And there shall be weeping and wailing and grating of joints: but 
lameness endureth but a week and Gym cometh again tomorrow. 



59 



Chapter 3 

And they removed from the Sophomore class and pitched into the 
Junior year, which was at the edge of the Profession. 

And all the Juniors went up into the Training School at the com- 
mandment of Dr. Mileham and taught there in the third year after the 
class of '42 were come out of the land of Ignorance. And it was the 
fourth day of the eleventh month. 

And for one who was to lead them they chose a wise one who was of 
the house of Black, by name, Ruth. 

O S. T. C. who shall abide in thy halls and who shall remain on 
this college hill? 

Those that are friendly to Freshmen, entertaining them well and 
wiping away tears from their eyes. Those that work hard at Mark 
Hopkins, nor do mean things to their pupils nor take on a dislike for 
comprehensive exams. These only shall abide in the halls. 

We were glad when they said unto us, "Let us go into the Masonic 
Temple" on the night of January 31st. For our Junior Prom was engrav- 
ed on the tables of our memories. 

S. T. C. had builded a haven where all are welcome. Whither the 
high school students come upon the invitations of the Juniors to play 
games and to be welcomed into the traditions of the college on the seven- 
teenth day of May. 

And the wise and wily Juniors did enter in trial against the other 
classes and did present a stunt, a feat of ingenuity. When the clouds of 
battle were gone they stood triumphant upon the field. 

Who is she who carries the flowers, the one who trotteth with 
posies? 

She is mighty in words and a singer of sweet songs. She thunders 
past as a charge of horsemen: she muttereth at the top of her voice so 
that no one may understand her. She writeth poems on the board and the 
faculty blusheth. She frighteneth the underclassmen and puzzleth the 
seniors. 

She is Miss Underhill, the teacher of English. 

Chapter 4 

And when three years were gone they became as Seniors who are the 
salt of the earth, spreading beauty and wisdom where e'er they walk. 
And they did rejoice and make proud themselves in the eyes of the under- 
classmen, for they were the Seniors whom the State loveth best of all the 
classes. But swift came the humbling of their pride for there was Logic 
and there was Classics which were as a great stumbling block to their 
peace of mind and well being. 

For a man to lead them they chose Primmer who was steadfast. 
And Pilgrims went forth from the gates. Yea, they rose up before the 
morning light and went forth in chosen chariots. When they were come 

60 



into the land of Bishop they opened up their mouths and taught. And 
of the fragments there were twenty-three. 

Great trials were upon the class and great decisions were made and 
great things were done, and they read stories for Miss Vining, and they 
signed slips for Miss Allyn, and they paid money to Miss Ferguson. 

And Miss Jenkins led them not through the way of the land of laziness 
although that was nigh, for she said, "Lest peradventure the seniors re- 
pent when they see leisure and they return to loafing." 

And she went before them by day a pillar of black and by night a 
pillar of conscience to make them study. And she caused them to send 
out epistles by the tens of thousands and she did sacrifice superintendents 
before them. 

How often, O my class, hast thou gone to first aid? How often 
hast thou gone to class? 

Yea, we number them as the grains of sand and as the drops of dew 
they are numerous. Many the times we have artificially respired and 
much air has flowed between the ribs. 

And lo, there was war upon the land and the spirit of battle moved 
among the people and they were brave. One of the class was chosen. 
Behold! one of the goodly young men. And he went forth to battle and 
many be the sons who will follow after him. 

O my college, thou art the rose of the Berkshires. 
Thy children appear on the earth: the time of the graduating of teach- 
ers is come and the voice of the speaker is heard in the land. 

The college putteth forth her green teachers and the class with the 
tender teachers gets the goodly jobs. 

Thy plants are an orchard of Freshmen with silly laugh: Sophomores 
with snickers: Juniors with smiles: 

Beautiful and wise are all the Seniors with all the fruits of their labors, 
lovely and smart with all the good jobs. 

The Beloved class has gone down into the valley to the beds of roses 
to feed in the gardens and to gather checks. 

And they were preached to and prayed over, and festivals — eating 

and drinking and glad dancing — were held, and they were graduated. 

Pray for the peace of the seniors that they shall prosper. For our 

fellow students' and teachers' sakes we will now say, "Friendliness be 

with all of us until the end of our days." 

Goderre 

Broadbent 

Rhoades 



61 



9<Mf> (9 lotion 



WE, TOO, HEAR AMERICA SINGING 

WALT WHITMAN heard America singing, and we, too, hear its 
voices raised in song — a vast symphony of one hundred thirty 
million voices — singing the powerful and compelling music of victory. 
Old and young alike have part in the song, but it is the armed forces, 
it is youth who is carrying the melody — youth who has been accused of 
disloyalty, unsettled youth who is adjusting itself to the solemn drum- 
beats of war — the drumbeats which reverberate throughout the world — 
the solemn drumbeats which we know will cease to be heard when the 
crescendo of victorious trumpets sounds. 

Why has youth been accused of disloyalty? In the past, youth has 
been subjected to a type of indoctrination which has undoubtedly served 
as a foundation for its apparent attitudes. The general tendency of 
novelists, dramatists, and public speakers has been anti-war in feeling. 
It has been constantly pointed out to us that the world has not been made 
safe for democracy. It has taken little observation to discover that the 
Glorious Experiment failed — and failed miserably. Is it strange then 
that youth was sceptical, that youth was lethargic? The futility of war 
became an academic question. Youth argued and speculated about the 
question, but when the crisis came it is we who arose with alertness and 
vivacity to work harder than we have ever worked before — to work for 
a cause we do believe in. 

It is youth who sets the tempo of the world. And the tempo of our 
world is no longer slow and leisurely. Factories are keyed to the word 
"speed"; they vibrate to the touch of youth's hands. Youth is leaving its 
comforts, its even, smooth life to serve in a world being ravaged by an 
angry man-made tempest. Can one say then that the younger generation 
lacks ideals? "And now to conceive and show to the world what your 
children en-masse really are." It is your children enmasse who are 
protecting you. We are proving to you that we do have ideals; we are 
proving it every day by the work we are doing. Every list of casualties is 
proving it; every list of heroes consists of names which are burned in 
our memories. 

Think of youth in the army — youth "toiling in the sun — boys in col- 
umns which "rise and fall to the undulations of the earth"; youth in the 
navy and marines sailing the seven seas, not for pleasure, not for lack of 
something to do, but to protect an ideal — indeed to protect a reality — 
democracy. Think of the youth in the air — boys who have lived too 
little to be already devoted to Death. The young who have not yet had 
time to live, really to know the modulations of life are sacrificing them- 
selves for a new generation to live in a more peaceful world — a world 
where freedom is the theme. It is the compelling theme of freedom which 
pushes us onward to make all the ideals of democracy become the herit- 
age not only of the youth of America, but of the youth of the world. 

62 



The theme is written, but to make its parts harmonize is not so easy. 
Like the army, the navy, the air corps, it takes alertness, intelligence, and 
clear thinking to blend together the chords of freedom and democracy. 

It is the young who are re-educating themselves to new thinking. 
We have developed our own theories and conclusions upon which we are 
acting. It is our thoughts, then, which will set the standards for future 
generations. We are sincere in the profession we have chosen, that of 
developing young minds. We will teach youth to be keen, to be alert, 
and to think. It is we who will help to develop the MacArthurs of the 
next generation. We are absorbed in America's melody of freedom and 
those who follow us will be absorbed in it, too. Walt Whitman's song 
is our song and it will be theirs — 

"And thou America, 

Thy offspring towering e'er so high, yet higher 

Thee above towering, 

With Victory on thy left, and at thy right hand Law; 

Thou Union holding all, fusing, absorbing, tolerating all, 

Thee, ever thee, we sing." 

Mar jo He Fairfield 



63 



9wf, Ode, 



A PRAYER IN SPRING 

SOFT, soft sigh zephyrs o'er springtime green 
And bursting buds of eager vernal flowers. 
Soft, soft he sweeps across the verdant scene, 
And bears away from us our schoolday hours. 
O King of Glory, guide us on our way, 
And aid us in the calling we essay. 
Give us that wisdom rare to realize 
How much there is to learn! We are not wise, 
But young and humble, our youthful pleasures 
To play, to hope, purchance to dream awhile, 
To laugh, to sing, to dance in carefree style 
Are yet important to us! Snatch not away 
In manner brusque these joys! Give us new treasures. 
O Son of Righteousness, show us thy light, 
And keep alive within our souls the white 
Hot heat of eagerness that burns today! 
Our supplication hear. For this we pray, 
Help us to live in thine own righteous way! 

Janet Broadbent 



64 



Stcdi&ticd* 



Ceres, Goddess of Agriculture Sessler as she sows 

Adam Faeder a fair field 



Rosy fingered dawn 



Eve 



Mr. Flagg he asked for it 



Fairfield will she raise Cain? 



Thalia, Goddess of Comedy Clark 



A bit of wit that makes you split 



Terpsichore, 

Goddess of Dance 



Vergil 

Darwin 

Venus 

Sirens 

Athena 

Montaigne 

Penelope 

Joshua 

Circe 

Delilah 

Nausicaa 



Szostak when she danced the Polka 



Broudy without detours 



Venable I may be wrong but 
Woodlock What's more she's got arms 
Brown, McAndrews, Yates They've all got a pitch pipe 



Black 



a natural 



Rhoades "The moving finger writes" 



Ouimette knit wit — not so dumb 



Sherman "He am one of de best" 



Mullins keeping the "Norm" 
Ebeling Cutting up again 



Collins nice catch 



To those who were left out-we can't be clever for ever, the Classics 
course wasn't long enough. You're all in the Rows of the Blessed. 



65 



QotPtM&nxxmetU Week 



Alumnae Luncheon 



Masonic Temple 1 P.M. June 6 



Baccalaureate 



College Hall 



5 P.M. 



Baccalaureate Reception Taconic Hall 



6 P.M. 



Picnic 



1 1 A.M. 



8 



Senior Prom 


Williams Inn 


9 P.M. 


8 


Class Day 




2 P.M. 


9 


Class Reception 


Taconic Hall 


3:30 P.M. 


9 


Senior Banquet 


Williams Inn 


7:30 P.M. 


9 


Buffet Supper 


Taconic Hall 


5:00 P.M. 


10 


Commencement 


- 


7:15 P.M. 


10 



66 



Baccatauteaie 



Sunday, June 7, Five O'Clock, College Hall 



SINGING: Hymn 

SCRIPTURE 

HOLY IS HIS NAME 



Choir 



PRAYER 



Handel 



HOW LOVELY IS THY DWELLING PLACE 

Choir 



Brahms 



BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS 



President Grover C. Bowman 



SINGING: Hymn 



67 



GlaU ^bay 



Tuesday, June Ninth at Two O 'Clock 



THE CALL 



THE PROCESSIONAL 



DAISY CHAIN 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME 



Margaret Wells 



ADDRESS TO UNDERCLASSMEN 



Walter Primmer 



RESPONSE 



Hollis Whitman 



THE PLANTING OF THE IVY 



Walter Primmer 



IVY POEM 



Janet Broadbent 



IVY ORATION 



Marjorie Fairfield 



CLASS SONG 



Words by Lieut. John Sherman 



RECESSIONAL 



THE THREE SINGERS 



STEPPING UP CEREMONY 



Tours 



Glee Club 



RECEPTION— TACONIC HALL 



68 



Gosnme+tc&mestt 



Wednesday, June Tenth at Seven-Fifteen O'Clock 

PROCESSIONAL 

INVOCATION Reverend Percy E. Thomas 

BENEDICTION Bach-Gounod 

Choir 

PRESENTATION OF CANDIDATES FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Wallace H. Venable 

PRESENTATION OF CANDIDATES FOR THE MASTERS DEGREE 

Dr. Harry S. Broudy, Director of Graduate Study 

AWARDING OF DEGREES President Grover C. Bowman 

PRESENTING OF DIPLOMAS 

AWARDING OF PRIZES 

ADDRESS Dr. Lucius A. Whipple 

President Rhode Island State Teachers College 

SINGING: America, the Beautiful 

RECESSIONAL 



69 



Autacfto&pJiA. 






70 



IdHxJteAclaAAttteH, 




PLUTO: GOD OF THE UNDERWORLD 



71 



fjurUoAA, 




President — Margaret Lane 
Vice-President — Hollis Whitman, now acting as president 
Treasurer — Althea Eddy 
Secretary — Audrey Pierson 
Representative to Student Council — Lucille Parsons 
Faculty Advisor — Andrew Flagg 



Norma Blanchard 
Betty Phelps 
Rita Rosch 
Geraldine Webster 
Mary Meade 
Gertrude Lyons 
Margaret Benson 



Louise Stone 
Rodney Card 
Shirley Bower 
Marguerite Cameron 
Jerome Green 
John McManama 
William Molloy 



72 



date Jlutosiy 



THE ODYSSEY 

In the Style of Homer 
BOOK '43 

NOW AS the minstrel touched the lyre, he lifted up his voice in sweet 
song, and he sang of the exploits of the Juniors. The gods had 
decreed that their members be lessened and therefore only twenty mem- 
bers were gathered together. Big brothers and sisters for the Freshmen 
were chosen, to advise and guide them. They plied the Freshmen with 
entertainment — a reception and a theater party — and encouraged their 
charges in the goodly ways of college life. 

Because of a desire of sweet song and of the happy dance, the class 
of '43 planned a glorious Junior Prom. Then the great Masonic Hall 
rang with the sound of the feet of dancing men and fair women. 

On a day in February the company of Juniors filled baskets with all 
manner of food to the hearts' delight and when they were come to their 
advisor's home they celebrated the approaching marriage rites of their 
class president, Peg. And when the day of St. Valentine came, they 
climbed into cars with strong wheels and traveled to Charlemont to 
make merry at her wedding. 

Then came the annual night for testing the ingenuity of the classes, 
and the crafty Juniors, inspired by the divine Muses, excelled in their stunt 
and won acclaim. 

This song it was that the famous minstrel sang, of the Juniors' valor 
in athletics, and their wisdom in all matters. 



73 



SofiAomosied 




President — Eleanor Fitzpatrick 

Vice-President — Evelyn Hampel 

Secretary — Eleanor Morrison 

Treasurer — Margaret Farr 

Student Council Representative — Martha MacAdoo 

Faculty Advisor — Lillian Boyden 



Naomi Michalak 
Elizabeth Meade 
Aline Kernahan 
Alice Galusha 



Hazel Davis 
Alice Beaudreault 
Frances Fitzgerald 
Helen Sindermann 



Jean Rivard 



74 



QlaAA, Jliita>uf, 



"THAT OUR INTENTIONS JUDGETH OUR ACTIONS" 
In the style of Florio's Montaigne 

THE COMMON saying is that "A sophomore is a wise fool." Now 
there is just such a class in the esteemed college of North Adams 
State Teachers. It befalls me to speak of the diverse things which this 
talented, if somewhat small class (amounting to the astounding round 
figure of fourteen!) has seen fit to do. 

There is a time honored custom in this schoole which is observed at 

the beginning of the year. It provides much entertainment for all classes 

except the new incoming class. I fret not my selfe about them, for the 

Sophomores introduce them properly which wins them much attention. 

"To aim why are we ever bold 

At many things in so short hold?" 

Hor. II Od. XVI 
For one unlimited day the Freshmen, as they are called, were initiated. 
This lawful proceeding should always have the common consent of all 
to observe and obey it. 

November 7 saw the Sophomores' main event of the year, vulgarly 
known as the "hop". Approximately 75 couples enjoyed the music of 
the orchestra. Balloon decorations transformed the usually austere 
Masonic Temple. 

"When matter we fore-know, 
Words voluntarie flow." 

Hor. Art. Poet. 311 
Very little time was given for preparation of Stunt Night, but ten 
studious minutes were entirely devoted to make ready quick, wittie, 
pithie remarks which were interpolated strategically. 

Thus the sophomores conducted themselves for the year 1941-1942. 
"Now time would be, no more 
You can this time restore." 

Lucr. HI 947 



75 



fyielltmest 




President — Gene Wise 

Vice-President — Geraldine Stanton 

Secretary — Anita Raymond 

Treasurer — Julia Gouda 

Representative — Ruth Sullivan 

Faculty Advisor — Edmund Luddy 



Eleanor Battista 
Alice Bligh 
Etta Burghardt 
Josephine Cirpovicz 
Alice Galipeau 
Bertille Horton 



Shirley Jacobs 
Patricia Lapan 
Bernice Lippman 
Jean Senecal 
Frances Slattery 
Charles Stein 



76 



GlaAA. ettutaiif. 



o 



SONG OF THE FRESHMEN 

As Walt Whitman would have written it 

F THE freshmen I sing, of the young green tenderfeet 
Yet of very good sports, — the word cooperative 



Of the Hallowe'en party I sing — 

On Wednesday, October the 29th — of the gay, 

hilarious spirit which reflected the 

mood of freshmen, I sing — 

And in April, the 24th the nautical adventure 
The S. S. 45, in alluring patriotic colors — 
of the more serious mood, of the 
successful Freshman dance I sing — 



77 



^lacxmic Jiall 




78 



ActuuiieA, 




DISCOBOLUS: SYMBOL OF ACTIVITY 



79 



Student Council 



11, 


. is B M| B # 


Hff Mi 




Tip>. <J| Bl - I 

En ' - >>yat ' aBu 

■SB '^V* ^r I "Mg JSS . 3BB 

**if^ ■■ BBj V V Bv 1 ^1 




b2b 


B. ^ ^^1 






'"*"'" 'f r Hi 





Officers of Student Association and Council 



President 
Secretary 
Central Treasurer 
Pres. Pro Tern 
Senior President 
Senior Representative 
Junior President 

Junior Representative 
Sophomore President 
Sophomore Representative 
Freshman President 

Freshman Representative 



Ruth Black 

Norma Blanchard 

John McManama 

Margaret Cameron 

Walter Primmer 

Marion Brown 

Hollis Whitman — acting 
Margaret Lane 

Lucille Parsons 

Eleanor Fitzpatrick 

Martha MacAdoo 

Gene Wise — acting 
Frank Dene 

Ruth Sullivan 



Mary Underhill 



Faculty Board 
Wallace Venable 



Beth Weston 



80 



Plata 



Student Council as Plato would have written it. 

Socrates — Ruth Black 
Glaucon — Norma Blanchard 
Adeimantus — John McManama 

I WENT up to school yesterday to purchase a book from the Cooperative 
Book Store, and on my way Glaucon hailed me and persuaded me to join 
a gathering of council members in the smoking room. And this was the 
question which the members had to ask of me — Has the Student Council 
this year carried out a program which has best served the needs of the 
students? 

Of a certainty we will need to consider the nature of students said 
Glaucon. 

Are there not three elements or principles found in the natures of the 
students? 

Do you not mean, interposed Adeimantus, reason, spirit and appetite 
or desire for pleasure and enjoyment in school life? 

I do. And must not each of these aptitudes be served in order to 
achieve the well being of our students? 

True. 

Have we not served the rational element by adopting a town meeting 
plan of government? 

Right, said Glaucon. And when the need arises this group has 
sought advice from a faculty-students relations committee. 

Did we not have the interests of the spirited, courageous element 
when we launched an all-inclusive program of war work? 

Exactly. — And surely we considered the desires and wishes of the 
students in the adoption of a school ring, and the planning of Stunt 
Night? For these reasons I can say that the Student Council has fulfilled 
its purpose as the executive branch of the student body. 



81 



QuW&tot &ve*itl Gluh 




President — Rodney Card 
Vice-President — Evelyn Hampel 
Secretary- Treasurer — Hollis Whitman 
Faculty Advisor — Edmund Luddy 



Barbara Beals 
Margaret Benson 
Norma Blanchard 
Roberta Colburn 
Frances Collins 
Hazel Davis 
Althea Eddy 
Frances Fitzgerald 
Eleanor Fitzpatrick 
Margaret Faar 
Lucille Goderre 
Jerome Green 
Aline Kernahan 
Gertrude Lyons 



Martha MacAdoo 
John McManama 
Elizabeth Meade 
Mary Meade 
Naomi Michalak 
Dorothy Mullins 
Katherine Osborn 
Eva Puppolo 
Betty Phelps 
Rita Rosch 
Dorothy Sessler 
Helen Sinderman 
Helen Szostak 
Audrey Pierson 



82 



New*, Qait&i 



CURRENT EVENTS CLUB REPORT 
By a news caster 

North Adams, June 1, 1942 (Special Dispatch) 

A review made here today indicated a very important trend in the 
activity of the Current Events Club. The investigating committee found 
that every member of the group has made some sort of contribution to 
the club's program. The President was highly pleased with the success 
of his program and the enthusiastic cooperation it has received. 

Under the guidance of Mr. Luddy a series of enlightening lectures 
and debates on current problems filled the program this year. A plan 
to keep the whole student body up-to-date by means of maps and as- 
semblies was carried out. Some of the club sessions were more enjoy- 
able because of refreshments served and these meetings were especially 
well attended. 

It is expected that the club will continue its successful career next 
year. The remaining members will carry on in the face of the study- 
blitz and sugar-rationing. 



83 



^bbasna Club 




President — Roberta Col burn 

Vice-President — Geraldine Webster 

Secretary-Treasurer — Margaret Farr 

Faculty Advisor — Mary Underhill 



Alice Beaudreault 
Ruth Black 
Etta Burghardt 
Lenita Clark 
Roberta Colburn 
Hazel Davis 
Marjorie Fairfield 
Margaret Farr 
Frances Fitzgerald 
Eleanor Fitzpatrick 
Lucille Goderre 
Lewis Green 
Shirley Jacobs 
Bernice Lippman 



Ian Malcolm 
William Molloy 
Eleanor Morrison 
Walter Primmer 
Mary Rhoades 
Helen Sinderman 
Geraldine Stanton 
Charles Stein 
Ruth Sullivan 
Stanley Sullivan 
Geraldine Webster 
Margaret Wells 
Gene Wise 
Jeannette Woodlock 



84 



£UcJzeAfiea>ie 



Clark- 



Goderre- 









Clark— 



DRAMA CLUB 
In the manner of W. Shakespeare 

Mark how, my friend, the mask and buskin mocks 
At truth, and seeming true is merely false, 
A marking o'er a masque called life, a life 
A play, a pleasant interlude to pass the hour 
To fill your minds with comic — 

Comic? aye! 
The whole thing's laughable. Call to your mind 
The yeas and nays, the time ill spent and dates 
That were upset and twisted wildly round: 
'Tis laughable and well called comic. 

I should be wroth with thee for what thou sayst, 
But anger is so weak a weapon that 
Should you but make me draw, then I would be 
But ill-portrayed — so anger serves me not. 
With soft and logic words I'll to you speak 
And win you to my thought. Remember how 
Through all the meetings past our chosen leader, 
Miss Colburn fair, guided us all full well, 
And sage advice was spoken by our council, 
Nestorian Underhill. Remember, how 
Our one act plays did die, and how long after 
A mystery stalked the halls at Greenfingers. 
Our interlude was gay, a pleasant thing 
Meant to amuse us which methinks it did. 






85 



Qlee Gluk 




President — Jeanette Woodlock 
Vice-President — Elizabeth Phelps 
Secretary-Treasurer — Jeanne Rivard 
Faculty Advisor — Lillian Boyden 
Librarian — Alice Galusha 



Alice Bligh 
Shirley Bower 
Marion Brown 
Etta Burghardt 
Marguerite Cameron 
Josephine Cerpovicz 
Lenita Clark 
Hazel Davis 
Alice Galusha 
Jean McAndrews 

Jeanette Woodlock 



Elizabeth Phelps 
Anita Raymond 
Mary Rhoades 
Jeanne Rivard 
Helen Sinderman 
Ruth Sullivan 
Helen Szostak 
Geraldine Webster 
Margaret Wells 
Gene Wise 



86 



Mulic Ode 



ODE TO MUSIC 
Imitation of Dryden 

Immortal Bach and Handel hover'd round 

Unnoticed 'mid the throng; aloft in airy state 

Intent on One alone: The inspiring Muses sate, 

Around their Priestess as in prayer, 

With anxious eyes and trembling arms upraised 

(As though by fear they were impell'd). 

Stood Her disciples, Music's pride — 

Woodlock and Cameron, and beside 

A pale assemblage who beseeching cried, 

"Lend us thine aid, Gracious Patroness most fair, 

Lend us thine aid; only thine aid can save our air!" 

II 

Upon the dais high stands the white-robed choir; 

Below the listeners nod content, 

Not seeing fair Lenita bending low nor Marion straining higher. 

The song supernal-borne, awaited by the Empyreal throng above 

(They bless it with their mighty love), 

Rises clear in blending harmony: sublime it strikes Miss Boyden's ear, 

She listens both in hope and fear — 

Then instantly her brow is clear! 

Her reassuring smile is bent 

Upon her inwardly rejoicing band of choristers. 

The list'ning crowd admire the lofty sound; 

"A very work of art," they whisper round, 

While silver cadences from paneled roofs rebound. 

With ravished ears the Parent hears — 

Assumes the god, affects to nod. 

And hides his prideful tears. 



87 



W. A. A. 




President — Helen Szostak 

Vice-President — Audrey Pierson 

Treasurer — Gertrude Lyons 

Secretary — Elizabeth Meade 

Head of Sports — Shirley Bower 

Advisor — Beth Weston 



All girls are eligible as members. 



88 



Spobtd, G(un*H&*itatai 



W. A. A. NOTES 
By a commentator 

What have we done to attain the Greek ideal of a "sound mind in 
a sound body"? Sports were always very important in the education 
of the Greeks and although perhaps our methods of keeping healthy 
would not have been popular in Greece, times change. 

We have no Mt. Olympus but we do have a Greylock which a band 
of more or less willing victims scaled. Although it may not be as high 
as that famed mountain, I'm sure most of us felt as though it were when 
we finally reached the top, where hamburgs and coffee awaited us. 

Several students braved the wintry blasts like Spartans to enjoy the 
Winter Carnival, which was hampered by a lack of snow. The spirit 
of these enthusiasts was high, and the Carnival proved that quality and 
not quantity makes for success. 

The Greeks probably never heard of tennis or soccer, but they were 
undoubtedly more proficient in the art of archery than the students of 
S. T. C. Although none of our arrows flew as straight as Cupid's, — our 
spirits were undaunted. 

Even the Greeks would have enjoyed Sports Night, for there was a 
wide variety of activities, not to mention the dancing and the inevitable 
refreshments. 

The lack of an amphitheatre did not interfere with Play Day, for the 
lawns provided an excellent playground for students and prospective 
students of our college. Although the victors received no laurel wreaths, 
they received their share of glory and of lunch. 

We may be proud of what our college has done to uphold the Greek 
ideal. 



89 



M. A. A. 




President — Stanley Sullivan 
Vice-President — Rodney Card 
Secretary-Treasurer — Valmore Lafontaine 
Faculty Advisor — Edmund Luddy 



All boys are eligible as members. 



90 



SfLGSvLl Analyst 



M. A. A. NOTES 
By a sports analyst 

Of course the reputation the association has built up as party throw- 
ers had to be maintained this year and their "Camera Highlights of the 
1941 Football Season" proved to be a social highlight of the 1942 Social 
Calendar. 

This off their minds, the boys went to work. Tricky plays were 
carefully conceived and cagey camouflage kept them concealed from scouts 
from enemy camps. (Those blackboard diagrams that were so prom- 
inent, it is revealed, had nothing to do with trigonometry). 

But someone once said something about the best laid plans of mice 
and things not continuing to cook when it comes to a showdown. The 
M. A. A. chooses to believe he was an uninformed gent. The exhibition 
basketball game played Sports Night was solid encouragement. "If 
we can play that kinda ball today what'll we be like when the V-l program 
gets under way?" asked the guys. 

To which our only answer is, we shall wait until next year. 



91 



l/eati Book 




BOARD OF CRITICS 

Yearbook Staff 
Editor — Mary Rhoades 

Assistants 
Stanley Sullivan Jeanette Woodlock Lucille Goderre 

Art Editor — Dorothy Sessler 

Photography Editor — Lenita Clark 

Business Manager — Dorothy Mullins 

Assistant — Katherine Osborn 

Faculty Advisors — Mary Underhill - Andrew Flagg 



92 



BaoJz Reaieiv 



BOOK OF THE YEAR 

Board of Critics 

This year book is an attempt to be different! The question is whether 
it is so successfully different that no one will understand it. Its theme 
"Classic" came from the Classics Reading course to which the Seniors 
were exposed during the first semester this year. Everything in it repre- 
sents something classical, it may be ancient or modern, but it is classical. 

In selecting the models for the different groups an attempt has been 
made to be obvious. However, it would be wise of the editors to include 
a few words of explanation. "Leaves of Grass" was a natural choice for 
the Freshmen who are so notoriously green; Montaigne, the sceptic, was 
allotted to the Sophomores, who are noted for questioning; the extremely 
modern House Council won an extremely modern write-up; the notably 
rational Student Council drew Plato. The obviousness of the Glee, 
Drama, Current Events Clubs and Sports reports speaks for itself, and 
please note the source of the faculty quotes! Of course, it was the first 
syllable of the title that made the "Odyssey" correct for the Juniors, and, 
since the Bible has everything and so have the Seniors what could be 
more fitting? 

All in all this is a truly great book, one that no one will care to miss. 
It has much of so many great books that it can hardly faiL We recom- 
mend it for your enjoyment. 



93 



cM&uAe Council 




President — Marguerite Cameron 

Vice-President — Lucile Parsons 

Secretary-Treasurer — Eleanor Morrison 

Senior Representative — Dorothy Mullins 

Junior Representative — Shirley Bower 

Sophomore Representative — Alice Beaudreault 

Freshman Representative — Gene Wise 

Faculty Member — Irene Golden 



94 



Models* MatiH&n, 



THE HOUSE COUNCIL 

In a modern manner 

Mondays at 5:00 p.m. — If those kids would only cooperate — Miss 
Golden's living room — Gee, it's nice out! — It's almost time for dinner, 
kinda hungry. Well, if she was five or even one minute late, she still 
deserves to lose her Saturday night permission — No excuse — the 
N. Y. A. girls are kept up. How much money have we in the treasury? 
It all went to defense? 

Christmas party — entertaining freshmen, decorative sophomores, 
and sticky, refreshing juniors — Seniors? — just relaxing. 

Wonder when we will have another air raid? Hours in that buggy 
tunnel if a bug is a bug is a bug is a bat everybody's bats alas, alas! 

We have to make how much to clear the Dorm Dinner Dance? Oh, we 
can do it easily. Whew! Just five dollars to the good — good food, 
good music. 

Time out for telephone interruption. We certainly have a lot of 

home work tonight. I wonder who is calling. Yes, it would be nice if 
Mr. Bowman sent back those rules — What permission can we have after 

this dance? Thanks, I will have a piece of candy — What's that you're 

making, an afghan? We had toast for breakfast, — I hope dinner is much 

more satisfying. Yes, we'll think it over this week and decide next 

Monday. Yes, by all means, let's give Mr. Eager a royal send-off. Dinner 

bell, let's go! 



95 



^m 



A 




MP - 



f{ 



■ 



111 ' 



I 






I 



n 



11 






- - 




^rii 



",^"7~. 










>7 




a?' s ?^' 






Adue^itUeine^uU 




HERMES: MESSENGER OF THE GODS 



99 



Compliments of 



Candyland 



Quadland's Flowers 



39 Main Street 



North Adams, Mass. 



Compliments of 

The Style Shoppe 

96 Main St., N. Adams, Mass. 

A complete selection of dresses 

for graduation 



Compliments of 



Daily's Restaurant 





Compliments of 


H. 


W. Clark Co. 


WHOLESALE GROCERS 




Since 1876 

i 




108 Main Street 



North Adams, Mass. 



Compliments of 



Fischlein's Ice Cream 



Nassif 's 



Professional Pharmacy 



Drugs - Luncheonette - Fountain 



100 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF 1 942 



fi 



rom 



YOUR YEARBOOK PRINTER 



I 




PtiHttiia , (lullna , Qwdma 



EXCELSIOR PRINTING COMPANY 

181 BRACEWELL AVENUE 
NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS 



101 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
To the Class of '42 

Kay's 

13| Eagle Street 
Sportswear — Hosiery Lingerie 



Sam Hirsh 

Drug Store 
5 1 Eagle St., North Adams, Mass. 



Compliments of 



ffflntol 



IGautuVring 



(Emttpanij 





Compliments of 


s. 


Anes & Co. 




115 Main Street 


] 


North Adams, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Beaman's Farm 

Pasteurized Milk and Cream 

Hodges Crossing 
Telephone 319 



Class Ring Ultra 



J. Richard O'Neil 
Company 

Cambridge, Mass. 



Class Ring Ultra 



102 



New England' s Foremost 
Photographers and Limners 



J. E. PURDY CO, Inc 

160 TREMONT STREET 



BOSTON 



Official Photographer 

State Teachers College 

North Adams, Mass. 



103 



It was our pleasure to serve 
the Students of 

£. «7. e. A A. 

in making the engravings 
which they have used this year 



GREYLOCK 
PHOTO-ENGRAVING CO. 

60 UNION STREET - REAR 

NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS 



104 



^biAectosuf, 




estate ^/eac/tetJ^ K-^alleae 



A/cvdU Adamd-, MaMacluUetU 



105 



Setu&id, 



Name 



Beals 

Black 

Broadbent 

Brown 

Clark 

Colburn 

Collins 

Courteau 

Crowley 

Ebeling 

Faeder 

Fairfield 

Green 

Koczela 

Lafontaine 

Malcolm 

McAndrews 

Mullins 

Newman 

Osborn 

Ouimette 

Primmer 

Puppolo 

Rhoades 

Sessler 

Sherman 

Szostak 

Sullivan 

Wells 

Woodlock 

Yates 



Barbara 

Ruth Evelyn 

Janet Jackson 

Marion 

Lenita Gertrude 

Roberta 

Frances 

Mary Frances 

Angela Margaret 

Althea 

Gustav Silas 

Marjorie Edna 

Lewis Morton 

Leonard Stanley 

Valmore 

Ian 

Jean Mary 

Dorothy Ann 

Mary Lucy 

Katherine Elizabeth 

Kathleen C. 

Walter Edmund 

Eva Columbia 

Mary Louise 

Dorothy Olla 

John P. 

Helen Edna 

John Stanley 

Margaret Helen 

Jeanette Marie 

Leila Redfern 



Residence 

79 Richview Avenue, North Adams 

Williamsburg 

103 Warren Avenue, Plymouth 

Cheshire 

Conway 

Williamsburg 

Mohawk Trail, North Adams 

33 Brooklyn Street, North Adams 

268 Church Street, North Adams 

8 Myrtle Street, Pittsfield 

209 Eagle Street, North Adams 
Delabarre Avenue, Conway 
52 Hull Avenue, Pittsfield 

9 Kearns Lane, Adams 
R.F.D. No. 1, North Adams 
Charlemont 

1 5 Second Street, Adams 

194 Towne Street, Attleboro Falls 

Hoosac Tunnel 

North Eagle Street, North Adams 

9 Powers Street, Adams 

73 North Street, Williamstown 

114 Francis Street, North Adams 

Mill River 

Colrain 

Cheshire (left) 

Russell Street, Hadley 

76 Cherry Street, North Adams 

Green River Lodge, Greenfield 

42 Pierce Street, Greenfield 

Walling Road, Adams 



fJu+tiaiA 



Name 



Benson 


Margaret M. 


Blanchard 


Norma June 


Bower 


Shirley Jane 


Cameron 


Marguerite Elizabeth 


Card 


Rodney B. 


Coughlin 


Donald 


Eddy 


Althea 


Goderre 


Lucile Gertrude 


Green 


Jerome Lester 


Lane 


Margaret Page 


Lepera 


Mary Carmela 


Lyons 


Gertrude Frances 


McManama 


John Joseph 


Meade 


Mary M. E. 


Molloy 


William Michael 



Residence 

196 Veazie Street, North Adams 

674 Union Street, North Adams 

Prospect Street, Housatonic 

Maple Street, Lenox 

142 Corinth Street, North Adams 

1034 Massachusetts Avenue, North Adams 

R.F.D. No. 1, Troy, N. Y. 

168 Vernon Street, Gardner 

42 Hull Avenue, Pittsfield 

Charlemont (left) 

5 1 Lincoln Street, North Adams (left) 

350 Main Street, North Adams 

39 Dartmouth Street, Pittsfield 

280 West Main Street, Williamstown 

16 Quincy Street, North Adams 



106 



Name 


Residence 


Parsons Lucille May 


Easthampton 


Phelps Elizabeth M. 


450 Main Street, North Adams 


Pierson Audrey 


Charlemont 


Rosch Rita Martha 


26 Yale Street, North Adams 


Stone Louise Marguerite 


Montague 


Webster Dorothy Geraldine 


Maple Street, Hinsdale 


Whitman Hollis 


Hancock 



SofUuunane.4, 



Name 

Beaudreault 

Davis 

Farr 

Fitzgerald 

Fitzpatrick 

Galusha 

Hampel 

Kernahan 

MacAdoo 

Meade 

Michalak 

Morrison 

Rivard 

Sinderman 



Alice 
Hazel 
Margaret 
Frances 
Eleanor 
Alice Clapp 
Evelyn R. 
Aline 

Martha Jane 
Elizabeth Ann 
Naomi 
Eleanor 
Jeanne A. 
Helen M. 



Residence 

651 North Chicopee Street, Fairview 
177 Kemp Avenue, North Adams 
2 54 High Street, Greenfield 

1 2 Elmwood Avenue, North Adams 
17 Manning Avenue, Williamstown 
Granby 

29 Harding Avenue, Adams 

86 Orchard Street, Adams 

8 Wall Street, North Adams 

280 West Main Street, Williamstown 

2 Alger Street, Adams 
Mill River 
Ashfield 

287 State Road, North Adams 



rftelltmen 



Name 



Battista 


Eleanor 


Bligh 


Alice Mary 


Buckley 


Maxine 


Burghardt 


Etta M. 


Cerpovicz 


Josephine 


Dene 


Frank 


Galipeau 


Alice Gertrude 


Gouda 


Julia 


Horton 


Bertille Anne 


Jacobs 


Shirley Doris 


Lapan 


Patricia Ann 


Lippman 


Bernice Charlotte 


Luczynski 


Walter 


Marlowe 


Geraldine Rita 


Peters 


Mary Elizabeth 


Quadland 


Margaret Ann 


Raymond 


Anita Jean 


Senecal 


Jean Marie 


Slattery 


Frances Elizabeth 


Stanton 


Geraldine Edith 


Stein 


Charles 


Sullivan 


Ruth Walling 


Wise 


Regina Ann 



Residence 

132 State Road, North Adams 
Housatonic Street, Lenox 
Lanesboro (left) 

2 1 Dawes Avenue, Pittsf ield 
Main Street, North Adams 

27 Blackinton Street, North Adams (left) 

218 Ashland Street, North Adams 

17 Columbia Street, Adams 

Maple Avenue, Hadley 

34 Williams Street, North Adams 

10 John Street, Williamstown 

7 1 West Housatonic Street, Pittsfield 

335 River Street, North Adams (left) 
212 Franklin Street, North Adams (left) 

336 East Main Street, North Adams (left) 
1 Brooklyn Terrace, North Adams (left) 

22 Hall Street, Williamstown 

9 Bracewell Avenue, North Adams 
9 Montana Street, North Adams 

133 School Street, Greenfield 
220 North Street, North Adams 
Park Street, Housatonic 

304 West Housatonic Street, Pittsfield 



107 



Auto.<j,lap,Ul 



108